Tim’s Vermeer: ​​A Documentary on how to Paint as Accurate as a Camera

Previously I shared a video about six artists to study for architectural photography. Johannes Vermeer, the 17th-century Dutch master, was at the top of that list. More recently I watched Tim’s Vermeer”, a documentary about one peculiar academic of Vermeer’s work.

The film is about Tim Jenison, his admiration for the photographic quality found in Vermeer’s work, and his (obsessive) quest to reproduce one of Vermeer’s masterpieces from scratch using optical aids.

When to Charge Separate Usage Fees

The topic of usage fees remains at the top of the list of questions I observe among architectural photographers. Many of us concur that a “standard” license for a commercial client would typically include rights for the client to use the images on their own website, social media, local advertising, and for other purposes of self-promotion (some refer to this as a “publicity and collateral” license). However, where exactly to draw the line varies dramatically across the industry.

Moshe Safdie: Another Dimension of Architecture – A Short Documentary Film by Jia Li

Israeli-Canadian architect, Moshe Safdie, first visited China in 1973.  Little did he know then, that nearly five decades later, he would realize one of the largest, most audacious architectural projects not only in China but on the entire planet. 

Raffles City Chongqing is the latest city-defining mega-project designed by Safdie, one that has been beautifully captured by Chinese-American filmmaker Jia Li. 

Why Great Architecture (And Photography!) Should Tell a Story – Ole Scheeren’s TED Talk

German architect Ole Scheeren’s TED talk from a few years ago has inspired me both as an architect and a photographer.  Founder and principal of the architecture firm that bears his name, Büro Ole Scheeren, Scheeren’s talk underscores his belief that ‘form follows fiction’ and that buildings must do much more than simply provide form to accommodate functional needs. 

Six Artists to Study for Architectural Photography

Knowing how to accurately represent space as seen by the human eye into a bidimensional media is relatively new. Early art depictions tend to focus on the spiritual and not on a literal representation of the world. Size and proportion of the subjects responded to hierarchy levels. It wasn’t until the Renaissance (circa 1415) that Brunelleschi’s proved a rational system to precisely represent depth and space, the linear perspective.

Architecture and Chill: The Built Space in Films

I must confess that I have never pressed the record button on my camera. Lately, the growing number of video platforms and the demand for architectural video has made me think twice about dabbling in video. Watching or re-watching films paying special attention to the role of architecture is a powerful tool and source of inspiration available to anyone interested in both architectural photography and video.

The Problem With Hyper Real Renders (And Photographs!)

This short and poignant video by the B1M highlights the increasing propensity for renders to exaggerate the truth, leading to disappointed clients and impossible design goals for projects. Not only do these renders mislead the public, setting them (us!) up for a lackluster new building, but they also have ramifications for photographers tasked with capturing these projects.

Architecture that Endures: Capturing Shanghai’s Long Museum Six Years On

When it comes to public architecture, photographers are typically tasked with capturing a building prior to it becoming fully operational or occupied.  This makes sense in many ways.  Larger scale architecture can take years of effort to realize, and architecture firms rightfully want to start integrating photos of the building into their marketing efforts as quickly as possible. 

Stop Emailing Rate Sheets

How many times have you received an inquiry from a potential client that, in the first message, includes something along the lines of, “What are your prices?” or, “Can you please send your rate sheet?” When this happens, do you typically reply with a PDF that outlines your entire pricing structure, or perhaps refer them to a page on your website?

Personal Projects by Two Singaporean Photographers Explore the City-state’s Diverse Heritage and Collective Identity

As the pandemic brought on by COVID-19 rages on, traveling beyond our city limits (or perhaps even our living rooms) remains an unlikely reality, at least in the short term.  Given that many of us are stuck at home, with more free time on our hands than we’re used to, I wanted to share a couple of photographers’ personal projects dedicated to showcasing the role architecture can play in crafting our sense of ‘home.’    

Pictures That Move: An In-depth Look At Making Films About Architecture

Architecture and the moving image, and of course photography and the moving image, have a long, intertwined history. By the turn of the 19th Century, the technology that the early photography pioneers were still experimenting with had progressed to the point at which they could record a series of stills in an incredibly short amount of time, and play them back to animate the sequence.

Archiporn – Is Social Media Killing Architecture?

Representation of architecture in social media is becoming more and more prevalent, as there is a trend where an architect or interior designer will design a space that will be more Instagrammble in the pursuit of getting likes. In this episode of Archimarathon, hosts Kevin Hui and Andrew Maynard both discuss how projects are now represented solely through the hero image rather than through architectural drawings in social media. 

Beautified China – Kris Provoost Celebrates the Architectural Ambition of a Nation

In his recently published book, Beautified China:  The Architectural Revolution, Belgian photographer Kris Provoost carefully curates dozens of the nation’s most spectacular architectural wonders.  Focused on showcasing iconic projects dating back to the lead-up to the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games, the book is a photo essay providing an abstracted, stylized glimpse into some of the China’s boldest, most dynamic buildings that collectively make up what Provoost dubs ‘the architectural revolution.’