An Intro To My Workflow With The Amazingly Powerful Luminosity Masks

I really don’t know how I could do my post-processing job without luminosity masking. When I mentioned this in my article The Architectural Photographer’s Digital Toolbox, many asked me to show my workflow with luminosity masking. While it is impossible to sum up in one single article, because I really use this tool for everything, I can make a start and give you a look into my process!

Prime Members Get Unlimited Storage On Amazon Photos – A Cloud Backup Alternative to Google Photos

While it maybe wasn’t as great for backing up photos as it was for compressing them, Google Photos was a perfect platform to use as an easy-to-access online portfolio that was always in your pocket. I was using it extensively, not just for sharing the photos from photography trips with my friends, but also to send images to my clients for fast reviews before the final delivery.

The Story of an Image – Woods Bagot’s Guohua Financial Center in Chongqing

The second installment of my recently created Story of an Image series takes us to the western Chinese city of Chongqing – a massive, uninhibited metropolis that most people outside China may not have even heard of.  While my previous article took you through my thought process for a non-commissioned portfolio capture, this time we’re on the clock working for global design firm, Woods Bagot, tasked with photographing both the exterior as well as the interior public areas of their Guohua International Financial Center project. 

Enhance… Enhance… New “Super Resolution” feature coming to Adobe Software

Adobe has just announced a new feature called “Super Resolution” which is now available in Camera Raw 13.2 (that includes the Camera Raw filter in Photoshop) and will be coming soon to Lightroom and Lightroom Classic.

According to this blog post by Adobe, “The term ‘Super Resolution’ refers to the process of improving the quality of a photo by boosting its apparent resolution.

Backup Basics for Photographers

Remember that time on Sex and the City when Carrie went to boot up her laptop and got Sad Mac? If you’ve never blown on a Nintendo cartridge or used a pencil to wind a tape cassette, you’re probably too young to remember Sad Mac (actually, you might also be too young to remember Sex and the City, in which case, thanks for making me feel ancient).

Photographing Homes While California is Choked in Wildfire Smoke

For those of us living in California and the rest of the West Coast of the US, it’s been a crazy few months to say the least. Wildfire smoke has engulfed nearly every part of the region at some point over the past two months, turning skies grey and orange from Los Angeles to Seattle.

Many architectural photographers have continued to work through the fires and the resulting smoke – myself included – to great frustration and annoyance.

Color Management in Architectural Photography

Architectural photographers routinely work in environments with multiple competing (and sometimes unusual) light sources. We are then expected to produce final images that accurately and artistically depict the captured spaces. From there, we carefully export files that need to show well on a variety of electronic devices, as well as print destinations ranging from wide-gamut gicleé prints to magazines printed with an offset press. Our clients generally don’t understand much about what goes on behind the scenes during this complicated process—they just want everything to work.

Get to Know Adobe’s Newest Features: Localized Hue Editing and ISO Adaptive Presets

Adobe has just updated its “photography plan” applications, Lightroom and Camera Raw with some great new features. Aside from the usual performance improvements, Adobe has (finally!) changed the user interface found on Adobe Camera Raw, integrating it seamlessly with Lightroom. Additionally, they have rolled out a couple of brand new features: ISO Adaptive Presets and Localized Hue Editing.

How to Straighten Your Images in Photoshop and Lightroom

One of the cardinal rules for architectural photography is that vertical lines must remain vertical. It’s considered bad form in many instances to photograph a building and have it look like it’s falling backwards, or heavily distorted. Unfortunately, there may be times when it just isn’t possible to achieve this in camera and some post production is required.

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