Usman Dawood

Staff Writer

For the last 6 years, I've been working as an architectural photographer; these years have been the best of my life so far and I'm enjoying it so much. I also have a YouTube channel which is steadily growing.

My personal life includes my wonderful wife, my beautiful daughter Amelia, and my cuddly cat Mew. My favourite sport is boxing, Spotify is life, and if I'm not taking a picture, I'm probably smoking a cigar.

Lightroom Just Received a Huge Workflow Update: Are You Switching Back?

Adobe has recently updated Lightroom and some of the new features are pretty useful.

As architectural photographers, I’m sure most of us are pretty familiar with having huge numbers of layers in Photoshop. Light painting and compositing can cost a lot of storage and many of us have become accustomed to using PSB files, especially with the advent of higher-megapixel cameras where only a few layers will put you over the size limit.

Five Gimbal Movements to Help Create Beautiful Interior and Architecture Films

I could be wrong here, but the way I see it, the market for filming real estate and architecture is possibly more lucrative than its photographic counterpart. For this reason, I think it’s probably a good idea for us photographers to develop our skills related to filming.

Yesterday, in our interview with Art Sanchez, Art recommended learning the basics of videography to help broaden your skills as a photographer, expand the services you offer your clients, and if nothing else, to make behind-the-scenes marketing content for your own business.

Canon 5DS R: Still the Best Camera You Can Buy for Architectural Photography

In February 2015, Canon released what I think is the best architectural camera made so far. Almost 5 years on and this camera is a little long in the tooth but in my view still the best camera you can buy for this specific type of photography. I’m aware some of you may want to point out the Sony options or Fujifilm medium format cameras, but, nothing comes close to how good the Canon 5DS R is.

How to Prevent Camera Shake When Photographing Architecture

Have you ever spent the day on location only to return home to go through the day’s work and realize that some of the images have motion blur? This is probably one of the most annoying little things you may encounter when starting to work as an architecture or interiors photographer. Frustratingly, it’s not easily detectable on the back of your camera screen unless you zoom all the way into the image, and even then can be invisible, so it’s something you need to make sure you catch while shooting tethered which isn’t always possible.

The 60mp Sensor in the Sony a7R IV Is Still Not Enough for Architecture

I can appreciate that many of you may assume I’m simply trying to trigger photographers with this article and its “clickbait” title. That is honestly not my intention because I firmly believe in what I’m about to discuss and I’m going to explain why I think what I do.

Whenever a new camera is released with a higher resolution sensor, the common subject that tends to come up is about how we’re back to the megapixels war.

How To Negotiate Better Prices with Prospective Clients

When I first started as an architectural photographer, one of the things I really struggled with was pricing. This seems to be a common thread for many creatives as it can be very difficult to objectively self-assess your talent, experience, and therefore, value. Some photographers charge less than minimum wage and others charge an absolute fortune for just an hour’s worth of work.

Five Mistakes Beginner Architectural Photographers Should Avoid

Starting a career in photography can be very challenging. I know that when I first started as an architectural photographer, I made a fair few mistakes that could have been avoided. Fortunately, those mistakes can serve as lessons for future architectural photographers.

1. Shooting With the Widest Available Lens

If you’re a real-estate photographer then shooting with the widest lens ever made might work.