Making The Best of Auckland’s Fickle Weather At The Franklin Road House With David Straight

Today’s Project of the Week is a moody beauty coming at you from architectural photographer David Straight based out of Auckland, New Zealand. The Franklin Road House was designed by Jack Mckinney Architects with interiors by Katie Lockhart Studio and is a sublime space. David has a boatload of great insight into this project and the way he documented it, so I’ll let him take it away!

Architecture that Endures: Capturing Shanghai’s Long Museum Six Years On

When it comes to public architecture, photographers are typically tasked with capturing a building prior to it becoming fully operational or occupied.  This makes sense in many ways.  Larger scale architecture can take years of effort to realize, and architecture firms rightfully want to start integrating photos of the building into their marketing efforts as quickly as possible. 

Stop Emailing Rate Sheets

How many times have you received an inquiry from a potential client that, in the first message, includes something along the lines of, “What are your prices?” or, “Can you please send your rate sheet?” When this happens, do you typically reply with a PDF that outlines your entire pricing structure, or perhaps refer them to a page on your website?

Photographing Isreal’s Bold And Graphic Escher House With Shai Epstein

Today we’re headed to Tel-Aviv with architectural and interiors photographer Shai Epstein! He has photographed the fun and funky Escher House for architect Adi Weinberg of Arbejazz Studio.

Shai masterfully shows off the punchy color contrast and graphic nature of this home. His compositions emphasize the rectilinear shapes and abundance of leading lines present throughout the space.

Personal Projects by Two Singaporean Photographers Explore the City-state’s Diverse Heritage and Collective Identity

As the pandemic brought on by COVID-19 rages on, traveling beyond our city limits (or perhaps even our living rooms) remains an unlikely reality, at least in the short term.  Given that many of us are stuck at home, with more free time on our hands than we’re used to, I wanted to share a couple of photographers’ personal projects dedicated to showcasing the role architecture can play in crafting our sense of ‘home.’    

Color Management in Architectural Photography

Architectural photographers routinely work in environments with multiple competing (and sometimes unusual) light sources. We are then expected to produce final images that accurately and artistically depict the captured spaces. From there, we carefully export files that need to show well on a variety of electronic devices, as well as print destinations ranging from wide-gamut gicleé prints to magazines printed with an offset press. Our clients generally don’t understand much about what goes on behind the scenes during this complicated process—they just want everything to work.

Mass Collective Co-Founder Francesco Russo Caught The London Mastaba Before It Was Gone

This week’s featured project comes to us from the Serpentine Lake in Hyde Park, London. In the summer of 2018, The London Mastaba — created by famed Christo and Jeanne-Claude — made its debut to parkgoers as part of the Serpentine Galleries, then disappeared 3 months later. Architectural photographer and Mass Collective cofounder Francesco Russo who splits his time between London and Venice made some beautiful photographs of this installation and sent them our way after the unfortunate passing of Christo early this summer.

How One of the Biggest Names in Photography and Visualization Deals With Attribution and Licensing

DBOX is an international creative communications agency that creates campaigns in the sectors of luxury residential, hospitality, commercial, and cultural property. Specializing in both renders and photography, DBOX is at the top of the global architecture marketing game and were kind enough to sit down for a chat with APA to discuss their inner business workings, their frustrations, and their efforts to remedy an industry-wide scourge.

Pictures That Move: An In-depth Look At Making Films About Architecture

Architecture and the moving image, and of course photography and the moving image, have a long, intertwined history. By the turn of the 19th Century, the technology that the early photography pioneers were still experimenting with had progressed to the point at which they could record a series of stills in an incredibly short amount of time, and play them back to animate the sequence.

On Film-Making and Soundtracks for Architecture with Multi-Disciplinary Artist Nikolas Strugar

I had come across Nikolas Strugar by way of Andy Macpherson talking about Nikolas on his BAAM podcast when discussing architectural filmmaking. Nikolas is based in Brisbane (Australia) and looking at his LinkedIn page, and I was intrigued by how varied his career was and the diversity of skills he has picked up along the way, especially how he manages to fuse his various skills on projects.

Archiporn – Is Social Media Killing Architecture?

Representation of architecture in social media is becoming more and more prevalent, as there is a trend where an architect or interior designer will design a space that will be more Instagrammble in the pursuit of getting likes. In this episode of Archimarathon, hosts Kevin Hui and Andrew Maynard both discuss how projects are now represented solely through the hero image rather than through architectural drawings in social media. 

How to Watch Canon’s New Product Launch

Rumor season is over. On July 9th, Canon will be presenting their whole new lineup of products highlighting the RF mount system via live stream.

The event — REIMAGINE — invites us to hear from Canon Ambassadors and experts on the biggest product launch yet. Canon branches have announced simultaneous transmission times on their websites:

Europe: July 9th at 14:00 CEST.

Hey New Photographers, Please Avoid Asking These Questions

When you’re first starting out in the industry, you have a million and two questions racing through your mind. This is great because it shows that you’re interested and looking to learn more! Most teachers will probably tell you that there are no stupid questions. In most cases, this is true — although — there are a number of reasons why certain questions should be avoided.